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MARIACHIARA PUVIANI


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Pubblicazioni

2015 - Building self-adaptive systems by adaptation patterns integrated into agent methodologies [Capitolo/Saggio]
Puviani, Mariachiara; Cabri, Giacomo; Capodieci, Nicola; Leonardi, Letizia
abstract

Adopting patterns, i.e. reusable solutions to generic problems, turns out to be useful to rely on tested solutions and to avoid reinventing the wheel. To this aim, we proposed to use adaptation patterns to build systems that exhibit self-adaptive features. However, these patterns would be more usable if integrated in a methodology exploited to develop a system. In this paper we show how our Catalogue of adaptation patterns can be integrated into methodologies for adaptive systems; more in detail, we consider methodologies which support the development of multi-agent systems that can be considered good examples of adaptive systems. The paper, in particular, shows the integration of our Catalogue of adaptive patterns into the PASSI methodology, together with the graphical tool that we developed to support it.


2015 - Integrating Adaptation Patterns into Agent Methodologies to Build Self-Adaptive Systems [Relazione in Atti di Convegno]
Puviani, Mariachiara; Cabri, Giacomo; Leonardi, Letizia
abstract

Agent systems represent a very good example of complex and self-adaptive systems. Adaptation must be conceived not only at the level of single components, but also at the system level, where adaptation must concern the entire structure of one system; adaptation patterns have been proposed to address both levels. Many methodologies have been proposed to support developers in their work, but they lack in addressing the choice and the exploitation of adaptation patterns. In this work, we propose an integration of adaptation patterns in agent-oriented methodologies, exploiting an existing methodology to concretely show how such an integration can be enacted.


2015 - Patterns for self-adaptive systems: agent-based simulations [Capitolo/Saggio]
Puviani, Mariachiara; Cabri, Giacomo; Zambonelli, Franco
abstract

Self-adaptive systems are distributed computing systems that can adapt their behavior and structure to different kinds of conditions. This adaptation does not concern the single components only, but the entire system. In a previous work we have identified several patterns for self-adaptation, classifying them by means of a taxonomy, which aims at being a support for developers of self-adaptive systems. Starting from that theoretical work, we have simulated the described self-adaptation patterns, in order to better understand the concrete and real features of each pattern. The contribution of this paper is to report about the simulation work of three patterns as examples, detailing how it was carried out, in order to provide a further support for the developers.


2015 - The Autonomic Cloud [Capitolo/Saggio]
Mayer, Philip; Velasco, José; Klarl, Annabelle; Hennicker, Rolf; Puviani, Mariachiara; Tiezzi, Francesco; Pugliese, Rosario; Keznikl, Jaroslav; Bureš, Tomáš
abstract

The cloud case study within ASCENS explores the vision of an autonomic cloud, which is a cloud providing a platform-as-a-service computing infrastructure which, contrary to the usual practice, does not consist of a well-maintained set of reliable high-performance computers, but instead is formed by a loose collection of voluntarily provided heterogeneous nodes which are connected in a peer-to-peer manner. Such an infrastructure must deal with network resilience, data redundancy, and failover mechanisms for executing applications. As such, the autonomic cloud thus requires a certain degree of self-awareness, monitoring, and self-adaptation to reach its goals, which has been achieved with the integration of ASCENS methods and techniques.


2015 - The Ensemble Development Life Cycle and Best Practices for Collective Autonomic Systems [Capitolo/Saggio]
Hölzl, Matthias; Koch, Nora; Puviani, Mariachiara; Wirsing, Martin; Zambonelli, Franco
abstract

Collective autonomic systems are adaptive, open-ended, highly parallel, interactive and distributed software systems. Their key features are so-called self-* properties, such as self-awareness, self-adaptation, self-expression, self-healing and self-management. We propose a software development life cycle that helps developers to engineer adaptive behavior and to address the issues posed by the diversity of self-* properties. The life cycle is characterized by three feedback loops, i.e. based on verification at design time, based on monitoring and awareness in the runtime, and the feedback provided by runtime data to the design phases. We illustrate how the life cycle can be instantiated using specific languages, methods and tools developed within the ASCENS project. In addition, a pattern catalog for the development of collective autonomic systems is presented to ease the engineering process.


2014 - Agent-based simulations of patterns for self-adaptive systems [Relazione in Atti di Convegno]
M. Puviani; G. Cabri; F. Zambonelli
abstract

Self-adaptive systems are distributed computing systems composed of different components that can adapt their behavior to different kinds of conditions. This adaptation does not concern the single components only, but the entire system. In a previous work we have identified several patterns for self-adaptation, classifying them by means of a taxonomy, which aims at being a support for developers of self-adaptive systems. Starting from that theoretical work, we have simulated the described self-adaptation patterns, in order to better understand the concrete and real features of each pattern. The contribution of this paper is to report about the simulation work, detailing how it was carried out, and to present a table of applicability that completes the initial taxonomy of patterns and provides a further support for the developers.


2014 - Enabling Self-expression: the Use of Roles to Dynamically Change Adaptation Patterns [Relazione in Atti di Convegno]
M. Puviani; G. Cabri; L. Leonardi
abstract

Self-expression is the capability of a system of changing its adaptation pattern at runtime; this can lead to better performance still keeping the achievement of the global goal in a Collective Adaptive System (CAS). In this paper, we show how self-expression can be achieved by means of roles. Developers can embed the adaptation logic in pieces of software that represent roles that system units can play: by changing the roles at runtime, the adaptation pattern changes as a consequence. Exploiting a swarm robotics case study, we show the applicability of our approach and the improvement of the performances with respect to keeping the same pattern during the execution.


2014 - Formalising Adaptation Patterns for Autonomic Ensembles [Relazione in Atti di Convegno]
Cesari, Luca; De Nicola, Rocco; Pugliese, Rosario; Puviani, Mariachiara; Tiezzi, Francesco; Zambonelli, Franco
abstract

Autonomic behavior and self-adaptation in software can be supported by several architectural design patterns. In this paper we illustrate how some of the component- and ensemble-level adaptation patterns proposed in the literature can be rendered in SCEL, a formalism devised for modeling autonomic systems. Specifically, we present a compositional approach: first we show how a single generic component is modelled in SCEL, then we show that each pattern is rendered as the (parallel) composition of the SCEL terms corresponding to the involved components (and, possibly, to their environment). Notably, the SCEL terms corresponding to the patterns only differ from each other for the definition of the predicates identifying the targets of attribute-based communication. This enables autonomic ensembles to dynamically change the pattern in use by simply updating components’ predicate definitions, as illustrated by means of a case study from the robotics domain.


2013 - A Taxonomy of Architectural Patterns for Self-Adaptive Systems [Relazione in Atti di Convegno]
Mariachiara Puviani; Giacomo Cabri; Franco Zambonelli
abstract

Autonomic systems are able to adapt themselves to unpredicted and unexpected situations. Such adaptation capabilities can reside in individual components as well as in ensembles of components. In particular, a variety of different architectural patterns can be conceived to support self-adaptation at the level both of components and of ensembles. In this paper, we propose a classication of such self-adaptation patterns { for both the component level and the system level { by means of a taxonomy organized around the locus in which the feedback loops promoting adaptation reside. We show that the proposed classication covers most self-adaptation patterns, and enables deriving further ones by applying a simple set of composition mechanisms. Three examples of existing patterns of the taxonomy are detailed in the paper to show the applicability of the approach. As discussed in the paper, the advantage of the proposed classication is twofold: it enables identifying the (possibly common) properties of the existing self-adaptation patterns; and, consequently, it can help developers in choosing the most appropriate self-adaptation patterns for the development of autonomic systems.


2013 - Is self-expression useful? Evaluation by a case study [Relazione in Atti di Convegno]
M. Puviani; C. Pinciroli; G. Cabri; L. Leonardi; F. Zambonelli
abstract

In the context of adaptive component-based systems, self-expression is the capability of changing the adaptation pattern when some changes occur in the system itself or in its environment. Even if functional requirements can be met without changing the adaptation pattern, the achievement of non-functional requirements, such as performance, can benefit from a change of adaptation pattern. The aim of this paper is to show, by means of a case study in swarm robotics, that a change of adaptation pattern can affect the performance of a system. In our case study, the robots must collect food items (foraging); we will show that while in an open arena the Reactive Stigmergy Pattern performs better, the Centralised AM Pattern better suits the presence of obstacles. Since the situation of the environment can be unknown in advance, or it can change at runtime, we claim that the change of adaptation pattern can be useful in adaptive componentbased systems.


2013 - Self-management for cloud computing [Relazione in Atti di Convegno]
Puviani, Mariachiara; Frei, Regina
abstract

Cloud computing is an emergent technology in the process of becoming ubiquitous. This requires strategies to deal with challenging situations. While a P2P structure is suitable under usual circumstances, other structures may be required in case of strong perturbations and disruptions. This paper describes a partial blackout scenario: the Cloud uses self-management properties to switch from a peer-to-peer structure to a temporary centralised structure, and then returns to normal. The system remains adaptive at all times, while maintaining performance under aggravated conditions. To achieve such self-management, a specific design pattern is suggested. Properties for self-adaptive and self-managing system are described, and implementation perspectives are discussed.


2013 - The Autonomic Cloud: A Vision of Voluntary, Peer-2-Peer Cloud Computing [Relazione in Atti di Convegno]
Mayer, Philip; Klarl, Annabelle; Hennicker, Rolf; Puviani, Mariachiara; Tiezzi, Francesco; Pugliese, Rosario; Keznikl, Jaroslav; Bure, Toma
abstract

Autonomic computing - that is, the development of software and hardware systems featuring a certain degree of self-awareness and self-adaptability - is a field with many application areas and many technical difficulties. In this paper, we explore the idea of an autonomic cloud in the form of a platform-as-a-service computing infrastructure which, contrary to the usual practice, does not consist of a well-maintained set of reliable high-performance computers, but instead is formed by a loose collection of voluntarily provided heterogeneous nodes which are connected in a peer-to-peer manner. Such an infrastructure must deal with network resilience, data redundancy, and failover mechanisms for executing applications. We discuss possible solutions and methods which help developing such (and similar) systems. The described approaches are developed in the EU project ASCENS.


2012 - A method fragments approach to methodologies for engineering self-organising systems [Articolo su rivista]
M. Puviani; G. Di Marzo Serugendo; R. Frei; G. Cabri
abstract

This article summarizes five relevant methods for developing self-organizing multiagent systems. It identifies their most relevant aspects and provides a description of each one under the form of method fragments expressed using SPEM (Software and System Process Engineering Metamodel). The use of a "metamodel" to describe fragments facilitates the comparison of the methods and their respective fragments. These fragments can be combined and be part of a more general ad hoc methodology, created according to the needs of the designer. Self-organizing traffic lights controllers and self-organizing displays are chosen as case studies to illustrate the methods and to underline which fragments are important for self-organizing systems. Finally, we illustrate how to augment PASSI2, an agent-based methodology which does not consider self-organization aspects, with some of the identified fragments for self-organization.


2012 - Adaptive Patterns for Intelligent Distributed Systems: a Swarm robotics Case Study [Relazione in Atti di Convegno]
Mariachiara Puviani; Giacomo Cabri; Letizia Leonardi
abstract

In order to propose some evaluation of adaptive architectural patterns for intelligent distributed systems, in this paper we present a case study where a swarm of robots is required to coordinate and adapt to perform a task. We will present the results of several simulations and propose some considerations that help further research about adaptive patterns in intelligent distributed systems.


2012 - Agent Societies to Design and Implement Complex Systems [Capitolo/Saggio]
G. Cabri; M. Puviani; C. Barbieri
abstract

Software agents are usually exploited to model and implement complex and un- predictable systems [17], paying attention to the interactions between component agents, in particular in open and heterogeneous systems. Agents may face situa- tions that was not completely predicted by their developers, which must rely on their adaptability derived from their features of proactivity, reactivity and sociality.


2012 - Self-healing in ensembles’ adaptive collaborative patterns [Relazione in Atti di Convegno]
M. Puviani; G. Cabri; R. Frei
abstract

Many of today's complex applications are composed of ensembles of service components which interact and collaborate with each other to satisfy user requests or to build higher-level services. In any case, we can recognize different collaboration patterns, which we have classified in a preliminary taxonomy considering autonomic features.In this paper we analyze the collaboration patterns from the self-healing point of view, in order to point out the support that each pattern can provide to self-healing features of the whole ensemble, and not only of the single component.Moreover, we will provide a concrete example by means of a case study based on autonomous robots that search for food in an unknown environment to fill a common nest.


2011 - Comparing Service-Oriented Computing and Agent-Oriented Programming towards Integration [Articolo su rivista]
G. Cabri; L. Leonardi; M. Puviani; R. Quitadamo
abstract

Service Oriented Computing (SOC) and Agent Oriented Programming (AOP) are two promising paradigms exploitedin the development of distributed systems. In fact, even if starting from different conceptual abstractions, both paradigms tryto face unpredictability and complexity in wide and open distributed scenarios. In this context, they exhibit both strengths andweaknesses. The aim of this paper is to propose a comparison between the two paradigms, performed with regard to some issuespeculiar of distributed systems that the two paradigms address: space decomposition, interactions among distributed components,reusability/customization, interoperability/heterogeneity and security. Of course the purpose of this paper is not to define the“best one”, rather the paper aims at providing developers with critical knowledge about the advantages and the limitations ofthe two paradigms. Finally, the need for a smart integration of the two paradigms is pointed out, which will lead to exploit theadvantages of both in a joint way. We briefly survey some proposals in this direction and report some considerations about them.


2011 - On Self-adaptation, Self-expression, and Self-awareness in Autonomic Service Component Ensembles [Relazione in Atti di Convegno]
Franco Zambonelli; Nicola Bicocchi; Giacomo Cabri; Letizia Leonardi; Mariachiara Puviani
abstract

Software systems operating in open-ended andunpredictable environments have to become autonomic, i.e.,capable of dynamically adapting their behavior in response tochanging situations. To this end, key research issues include:(i) framing the schemes that can facilitate components (orensembles of) to exhibit self-adaptive behaviors; (ii) identifyingmechanisms to enable components or ensembles to self-expressthe most suitable adaptation scheme; and (iii) acquiring theproper degree of self-awareness to enable putting in action selfadaptation and self-expression schemes. In this position paper, with the help of a representative case study, we frame anddiscuss the above issues, survey the state of the art in the area,and sketch the main research challenges that will be faced inthe ASCENS project towards the definition of a fully-fledgedframework for autonomic services.


2011 - Towards a Taxonomy of Adaptive Agent-based Collaboration Patterns for Autonomic Service Ensembles [Relazione in Atti di Convegno]
G. Cabri; M. Puviani; F. Zambonelli
abstract

Services are increasingly becoming the building block of today's distributedsystems. However, to support the development of robust complex applications made up ofensembles of cooperating service components and to promote autonomic features(i.e., self-management and self-adaptation), adaptive collaboration patterns among components have to be enforced. In this paper, to analyze adaptive collaboration patterns in agent-based terms,we would like to introduce a taxonomy of adaptive agent-based collaborationpatterns, for their exploitation in the area of autonomic service ensembles. The proposed taxonomy, as preliminary as it can be, has two main advantages: (i) it enables the reuse of existing experience from the agents' world in the area of autonomic service systems, and (ii) it can provide useful suggestions to designer for the choice of the most suitable patterns.


2010 - Building an Agent Methodology from Fragments: the MEnSA experience [Relazione in Atti di Convegno]
M. Puviani;M. Cossentino;G. Cabri;A. Molesini
abstract

To fill the existing gap between agent-oriented methodologies and multi-agent system infrastructures, we studied how to build a new methodology that takes into consideration the infrastructures' features. Our aim was, starting from specific requirements, to reuse fragments of existing methodologies by composing them, because they are documented, known and tested. To this purpose we exploited the Situational Method Engineering (SME) approach, and used the OMG standard Software Process Engineering Metamodel (SPEM) as a tool for describing the processes. In this paper we present the motivations of our approach, the work we have done to compose the new methodology, briefly the resulting methodology, and some lessons learned.


2010 - USE OF ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE TECHNIQUES TO THE INTERPRETATION OF SUBSURFACE LOG IMAGES [Articolo su rivista]
D. FERRARETTI; L. TAGLIAVINI; R. DI CUIA; M. PUVIANI; E. LAMMA; S. STORARI
abstract

The correct interpretation of subsurface borehole log ima- ges is fundamental in the characterisation of the subsurface hydrocarbon reservoirs. This interpretation is very complex and can be strongly affected by the experience and knowledge of the area of the geologist. The aim of this work is to create an expert system to support the petroleum geologist in his interpretation work, by using artificial intelligence techniques and image processing algorithms for the analysis of image borehole logs. During the first step of this methodology some notable image features using image processing algorithms are identifies. These features are represented by values that are managed by the artificial intelligence algorithms. The second step is the classification by a supervised learner. All the classes obtained, describe the physical properties of the entire well. These classes can help the geologist in correctly describing the properties of the rocks. The overall prototype integrates the algorithms previously used for the image processing and artificial intelligence and have been tested and validated with a number of real datasets.


2009 - Agent Societies to Design and Implement Complex Systems [Capitolo/Saggio]
G. CABRI; PUVIANI M; BARBIERI C
abstract

Software agents are usually exploited to model and implement complex and unpredictable systems, paying attention to the interactions between component agents, in particular in open and heterogeneous systems. Agents may face situations that was not completely predicted by their developers, which must rely on their adaptability derived from their features of proactivity, reactivity and sociality. But this could not be enough: social norms must be enforced to rule the agent interactions in open environments. Moreover, social norms enable to enact local policies as well, i.e. policies defined by the environment where agents live. To this purpose, the abstraction of agent societies has been proposed and applied to complex systems.In this paper we address the development of agent societies, in particular considering methodologies and infrastructures. We will present the existing methodologies and point out the degree of the available specific support for societies. Moreover, we will explain that appropriate support must be provided also by underlying infrastructures. Further, we will show that there is a gap between methodologies and infrastructures that leads to fragmented solutions; we will sketch some proposals to bridge such a gap by means of meta-models.


2009 - Experiences in Applying Situational Method Engineering in AOSE [Relazione in Atti di Convegno]
M. Puviani;G. Cabri;L. Leonardi
abstract

In the software engineering field different methodologies have been provided to support developers in their work. However, the development of systems proposes complex and different scenarios nowadays, and existing methodologies can hardly meet the requirements of all existing scenarios. This problem can be solved applying the Situational Method Engineering (SME) approach, which enables to build appropriate methodologies by composing fragments of existing ones. This approach has also the valuable advantage of reusing models, solutions and tools of existing and tested methodologies. In this paper, we focus on Agent Oriented Software Engineering (AOSE) and reports three examples of application of the Situational Method Engineering approach. We show that this approach can be applied following different directions, and in particular: entity-driven, metamodel-driven, and characteristic-driven. To concretely show these directions, we present three examples of methodologies for developing agent and self-organizing systems, all constructed composing methodology fragments to meet scenario requirements.


2009 - Methodologies for self-organising systems: a SPEM approach [Relazione in Atti di Convegno]
M. Puviani; G. Di Marzo Serugendo; R. Frei; G. Cabri
abstract

This article summarises five relevant methods for developing self-organising multi-agent systems. It identifies their most promising aspects and provides a meta-model of each under the form of 'SPEM fragments'. These fragments can be combined and be part of a larger ad hoc methodology. Self-organising traffic lights were chosen as an illustrating example for the relevant features of the different methods considered.


2009 - The MAR&A Methodology to Develop Agent Systems [Relazione in Atti di Convegno]
G. CABRI; PUVIANI M; LEONARDI L
abstract

In this paper we present a new agent methodology called MAR&A. Its aim is to better connect agent methodologiesand agent infrastructures, since in the agent development we can find a “gap” between them. Ourapproach was not to build a new agent methodology from scratch, but to reuse “fragments” of existing methodologies.Besides presenting the methodology, we propose its use in a case study, to help readers understandthe exploitation of this methodology and to sketch the connections with agent infrastructures.


2009 - The future of AOSE: exploiting SME for a new conception of methodologies [Relazione in Atti di Convegno]
Puviani, Mariachiara; Cabri, Giacomo; Leonardi, Letizia
abstract

In the last years, the software engineering eld has provided developers with dierent methodologies to support their work. Nevertheless, existing methodologies can hardly meet the requirements of all existing scenarios, which are more and more complex and highly dierentiated. This problem can be faced by applying the Situational Method Engineering (SME) approach, which enables to build appropriate methodologies by composing \fragments" of existing ones. We envision this approach as the future of software engineering in general, and in particular if applied in Agent Oriented Software Engineering (AOSE). This approach has also the valuable advantage of reusing models, solutions, experiences and tools of existing and tested methodologies. In this paper we report three examples of application of the Situational Method Engineering approach in AOSE. We show that this approach can be applied following dierent directions, and in particular: entity-driven, metamodel-driven, and characteristic-driven. To concretely show these directions, we present three examples of methodologies for developing agent systems (one regarding self-organising systems), all constructed composing methodology fragments to meet the scenario requirements.


2008 - Agent Roles: from Methodologies to Infrastructures [Relazione in Atti di Convegno]
PUVIANI M; G. CABRI; LEONARDI L
abstract

Role is an important and useful concept to define the collaboration in agent systems, since it allows to abstract from physical agents and to focus on their behaviour. So, the role concept is exploited in agent methodologies and agents infrastructures, but often in different and discontinue ways. The aim of this paper is to map the role concepts proposed in different agent methodologies, and also mapping other concepts related to role. Moreover, we try to extend this mapping also to agent infrastructures, so to help developers choosing the right methodologies and infrastructures. Providing a comparison (and outlining the contrasts) will be important and useful as a starting point to understand and to try to unify foundational agent concepts.


2008 - Connecting Methodologies and Infrastructures in the Development of Agent Systems [Relazione in Atti di Convegno]
G. CABRI; PUVIANI M; QUITADAMO R
abstract

In the building of agent systems developers canbe supported by both appropriate methodologies and infrastructures, which guide them in the different phases of thedevelopment and provide useful abstractions.Nevertheless, we assist to a situation in which methodologiesand infrastructures are not connected each other: the products ofthe analysis and design phases could not always be exploited inthe implementation phase in a direct way, even if sometimesCASE-tools are present to help in translating methodologies’diagrams in infrastructures’ code. This leads to a “gap” betweenmethodologies and infrastructures that is likely to producefragmented solutions and to make the application maintenancedifficult.In this paper we face this issue, proposing three directions tosolve the problem. We do not want to propose a “new brand”methodology and infrastructure tightly connected, rather, weaim at reusing as much as possible what already exists, notonly in abstract terms, but also in concrete “fragments” ofmethodologies; an appropriate meta-language that describes howa methodologies works would be useful to more easily mapthem onto the infrastructures, or even to “compose” a newmethodologies. A further approach is based on an “intermediate”layer between methodologies and infrastructures, which providesa mapping between the involved entities.


2008 - Methodologies and Infrastructures for Agent Society Simulation: Mapping PASSI and RoleX [Relazione in Atti di Convegno]
G. CABRI; LEONARDI L; PUVIANI M
abstract

Today’s development of agent applicationsin general, but in particular related to society simulation, presents two aspects thatare separated by a gap: agent methodologies and agent infrastructures. On the onehand, methodologies support the agent development in its first phases—mainly analysis and design—while infrastructures areclearly focused on the implementation anddeployment. Unfortunately, there are fewconnections between them, leading to fragmented solutions. In this paper, we proposeto bridge this gap by means of meta-models,and we show how the PASSI methodologyand the RoleX infrastructure can be connected by following our approach.


2008 - Methodologies for Designing Agent Societies [Relazione in Atti di Convegno]
G. CABRI; LEONARDI L; PUVIANI M
abstract

Today's complex systems can be addressed by exploiting software agents, and in particular sets of interacting agents. Agent societies represent a powerful means to design organization-oriented agent-based systems, in particular those where agents belonging to different users meet and interact. To effectively exploit them, developers must be supported by appropriate methodologies. In this paper we present a survey of agent-based methodologies, evaluated under some criteria that, in our opinion, are useful for developing societies. Our aim is to help developers in understanding the society-related features and choosing the most appropriate to their needs.


2008 - Towards filling the gap between AOSE methodologies and infrastructures: requirements and meta-model [Relazione in Atti di Convegno]
Fabiano, Dalpiaz; Ambra, Molesini; Puviani, Mariachiara; Valeria, Seidita
abstract

Many different methodologies have been proposed in Agent Oriented Software Engineering (AOSE) literature, and the concepts they rely on are different from those adopted when implementing the system. This conceptual gap often creates inconsistencies between specifications and implementation. We propose a metamodel-based approach that aims to bridge this gap, resulting in an integrated meta-model that merges the best aspects of four relevant AOSE methodologies (GAIA, Tropos, SODA and PASSI). The meta-model assembly followed a welldefined process: for each methodology to be integrated in the meta-model, we elicited the requirements, identified a set of process fragments, thoroughly compared the concepts belonging to the various fragments, and finally composed the meta-model.


2007 - Service-Oriented Agent Methodologies [Relazione in Atti di Convegno]
G. CABRI; LEONARDI L; PUVIANI M
abstract

Agents and services are two concepts that more andmore are integrating and exploiting the advantages ofeach other. Agent-oriented methodologies effectivelysupport the development of agent-based system in thedifferent phases. In this paper, we explore how andhow much the most common agent-orientedmethodologies are also oriented to the development ofservices. Rather than searching for the “best”methodology, we aim at defining some evaluationcriteria and surveying the existing methodologiesconsidering such criteria.